The benefits of transparency in clinical trialling

A rule that comes into force on January 18th, 2017, will require that researchers make their trial data public. It is also thought that there will be an increased demand for financial transparency in clinical trials.

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Why is Financial Transparency so Important?

Clinical trials frequently have unpredicted expenses that are often related to start up and operational processes. If these costs can be projected and accurate forward planning is possible, there can be considerable benefits for the trial and the business in general.

Trials have become more complex than ever before, causing increased difficulty in obtaining and sorting data. Financial control and visibility can help to support compliance when evidence of this needs to be displayed.

A study published in the BMJ found that experimental interventions were significantly favoured in the authors’ conclusions in cases where the financial competing interests were declared, so the association between competing financial interests seems to affect outcomes of trials. This is why transparency is of major importance in pharmaceutical consulting and similar projects.

In advancing the development of new medications, there is a constant search for areas where efficiencies can be introduced. Collaboration with partners such as http://www.gandlscientific.com/pharmaceutical-consulting/ need to be strong and it is important that trials are planned and budgeted accurately.

How Can Financial Transparency Benefit Companies?

Being able to create accurate projections of the costs involved in a trial can allow organisations to make adjustments to cost expectations if it becomes necessary. By centralising and automating financial transactions, companies are better able to establish actual costs and link them to budget data, especially where there are sites in various different geographic regions.

Real time analytics allow trial managers to monitor and control enrolment requirements and to intervene to manage patient related costs by capping them if they need to.

Being able to see statistics for patient enrolment at every site and refine cost projections on an ongoing basis will mean that the revised cost projections are far more accurate than initial budgets.

Following the enrolment phase, patient numbers normally remain static and the analytics will focus on whether the study is likely to remain within budget and what cash outflow needs and current liabilities exist.

Stakeholders will appreciate the financial transparency and be more likely to invest in projects where they can be assured of consistent, clean and comprehensive data.